Covert MP8 Review

Covert MP8 Review: Is This Cheap Trail Camera Reliable?

In this post, I’ll review the Covert MP8 trail camera.

Do you remember hunting prior to the introduction of trail cameras?

Over the past 10 years, trail cameras, like Covert MP8, have revolutionized hunting.

Covert has continued to make the Covert MP8 trail camera since 2013, which is a good sign, and indicates the camera is a favorite among hunters.

The Covert MP8 is comparable to Brownings Dark Ops or Cuddeback’s Powerhouse camera.

Covert built up credibility among outdoorsmen by producing a decent camera with exceptional customer service. For example, manuals can be accessed on their website. Firmware updates are also available on their website.

Covert also offers a 2 year warranty on manufacturer defects on cameras made in 2016 or later. The company has been around since 2008 and is a reliable company in the hunting industry.

The Covert MP8 trail camera is a reputation for being economical, reliable, and rugged. If you are a beginner and don’t know which trail camera to buy, then you should go through our buying guide.

Some of its features are:

  • Infrared technology or black flash technology
  • Picture Bursts or Video options
  • 3,5, or 8 megapixel photos captured
  • 1 inch photo viewer for in-field viewing
  • Adjustable video segments captured

What’s in the box?

The Covert MP8 has reliable attributes that will not disappoint. The camera comes securely packaged to protect the product while being transported.

The camera also comes with an adjustable strap for hanging the camera in the field.

Build and design

Covert MP8

Have you ever broken the latch off a camera? I sure have!

One physical attribute I now value is dual latches. A couple years ago, I broke the latch off a camera, and rendered the camera useless because the door would no longer resist water.

The MP8, however, is rugged and has dual latches located on the side of the camera to ensure a tight seal and resistance to water. If you are like me and do end up breaking a latch on your camera, you will be able to keep using the camera with one latch.

There is a compatible lock box for the camera like the CamLockbox. The lockbox should keep unwanted animals, such as bears, from causing injury to the camera. Lockboxes also help keep wandering humans from tampering with your camera.

The overall design of the trail camera was the first attraction that caught my eye. As avid hunters, we rely on cameras for information.

I veer away from bulky cameras for a couple of reasons:

  • Bulky cameras drawn unwanted attention from wildlife and humans
  • Bulky cameras are hard to carry

Covert’s MP8 scouting camera is small and compact with a sleek design. The camera can easily be concealed and hidden from deer as well as other wildlife, such as a perceptive coyote.

The camera is available in either Mossy Oak or Realtree camouflage to help break up the profile of the camera and hide it from both animals and other humans. You should take care while placing the trail camera.

The camera is small enough you can put it in the pocket of your hunting jacket, or pack. It is easy to tote around and move from place to place.

The MP8 camera is fairly easy to setup and use. If you don’t know how to set up trail cameras, refer to this post. you can The ports are easily accessible and easy to use and the design provides a tight seal that will keep water out and the camera functioning.

Features:

The overall quality of the Covert black ops trail camera pictures is acceptable when you consider the camera is 8 megapixels.

You will not get vibrant images of wildlife, but the camera performs as expected, and will help you view the deer living in your hunting area.

If you are looking for high-quality photos, this is not the camera for you, and you should look at a camera with more megapixels like Browning’s Recon Force or Moultrie’s M-999i game scouting camera.

Admit it,

You have checked your trail camera and have scrolled past the hind-end of a deer.

Yep.

Your camera was too slow to capture the full image of the animal. Was it a trophy? We will never know…

One great thing the Covert MP8 offers is the versatility of the camera. You can set the camera to capture bursts of photos at a time.

When a deer walks by, the sensor triggers the camera to capture between 1 and 10 images. The 10 image bursts helps you see if other deer are following an initial deer. It helps show more of a story about the deer herd.

Image quality:

When selecting a camera, maintaining a low-intrusive camera is important.

Early flash cameras used to have bright flashes. Deer would look directly at the camera and would know exactly where it was located.

This is bad, you might as well have a flashing neon sign instead of a camera. BUSTED!

With technological advances, less intrusive alternatives exist.

For instance, the Covert scouting camera MP8 utilizes the newer technology of infrared flash or black flash. Covert claims the flash will reach 100 feet, which produces a decent photo during the day and during low light. With some field testing, I believe these claims to be fairly accurate.

However, when light levels drop, and the infrared kicks in, the clarity of pictures decreases.

Pictures can be fuzzy and blurred at night.

During the night, clear images and video can be captured about 40 feet away. When deer or wildlife are farther than 40 feet, it begins to become difficult to view animals with accuracy.

This is not necessarily a poor function of the MP8 black camera; you could expect similar results with the majority of infrared cameras, especially with resolutions of 8 megapixels like Cuddyback’s 8 MP camera or Stealth Cam’s 8 MP camera. Night photos and video across all brands are harder to capture a decent photo.

The lights-out technology does help reduce the presence of the camera.This aids in concealing the camera’s presences.

Sometimes we might view the invisible infrared flash as a reddish glow. Scientists speculate that deer have difficulties viewing reds as we do and instead see the red as a shade of gray.

The vast majority of deer observed walk right by the camera without noticing it. The infrared technology does not seem to alert deer to the camera’s presence.

Detection and trigger:

Probably the biggest deterrent to this camera is the trigger speed. Trigger speed is the time it takes for the camera to take a picture once the motion detector senses movement.

Generally, high-end expensive cameras tend to have fast trigger speeds. For the price of this camera, a 0.9 second trigger speed can be expected.

Slow trigger speeds cause cameras to miss the wildlife triggering the camera. This is when we get pictures of just the end of a whitetail or complete misses of the animal that set off the camera in the first place.

Storage, viewfinder, and connectivity

Covert MP8 Camera

One downside of the camera is the SD card storage limitations. The MP8 camera is compatible with SD cards up to 32 GB. Allowing over 13,000 photos.

Ask yourself if 13,000 photos will fill up before you are able to check the camera. For some of us, it will be just fine, but others prefer to check trail cameras less often.

For the price, it doesn’t come with any wireless features for connectivity.

After conducting the Covert trail camera review, I was impressed by the 1-inch viewer. The viewer lets you check your pictures on the camera. If you are checking your camera on the way to your stand that valuable information can help you decide to continue on to your stand, or move to a different place.

Photos taken help us know about the deer walking by that location. If there haven’t been many deer walking by you camera, you know your chances of seeing a deer that morning are not so great.

The viewer is a feature you would usually expect on more expensive cameras. What a neat feature for the price of the covert black ops trail camera.

Battery:

The Covert black ops trail camera uses AA batteries. You can use 4 or 8 batteries to run the camera.

I do not know about you, but I hate changing batteries. It can get expensive over time.

What is worse is when you go to check your camera and the batteries are dead. One great thing the Covert black ops trail camera is that it is pretty gentle on the batteries.

You can leave the camera out a couple months and may not have to change the batteries. Like all electronics, cold weather drains the batteries faster, but overall, the camera does not use an excessive amount of batteries.

Pros and cons

Pros:

  • Light weight
  • Compact design
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Slow trigger speed
  • Max use 32 GB SD card

Conclusion:

This camera has a slower trigger speed and you will miss images of wildlife here and there due to the time lapse. The photos captured are decent, but not the great images you get with a higher resolution camera.

When compared with cameras of similar price, you can conclude you are getting a well-built quality camera. The camera has some neat features, such as the view screen. Most viewer screens are on more expensive products.

Overall, this is a great camera for the price.

This camera was built for the average hunter; someone who works hard and does not want to spend a fortune on a trail camera. It is compact and ruggedly built, making it ideal for transporting in the field. You cannot go wrong if you purchase this camera, as it will not disappoint.

The Covert MP8 is, arguably the best performing low-budget camera on the market.

Hope you found this review on Covert MP8 helpful!

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